BROMO

Introdução

Número atômico: 35
Grupo: 17 or VII A
Peso atômico: 79.904
Período: 4
Número CAS: 7726-95-6

Classificação

Calcogênio
halogênio
Gás nobre
Lantanóides
Actinóide
Terra-rara
Platinum Metal Group
Transuranium
Não Isótopos Estáveis
Sólido
Líquido
Gás
Sólido (previsto)

Descrição • Usos / Função

Discovered by Balard in 1826, but not prepared in quantity until 1860. A member of the halogen group of elements, it is obtained fromnatural brines from wells in Michigan and Arkansas. Little bromine is extracted today from seawater, which contains only about 85 ppm. Bromineis the only liquid nonmetallic element. It is a heavy, mobile, reddish-brown liquid, volatilizing readily at room temperature to a red vapor with a strongdisagreeable odor, resembling chlorine, and having a very irritating effect on the eyes and throat; it is readily soluble in water or carbon disulfide,forming a red solution, is less active than chlorine but more so than iodine; it unites readily with many elements and has a bleaching action; when spilledon the skin it produces painful sores. It presents a serious health hazard, and maximum safety precautions should be taken when handling it. Muchof the bromine output in the U.S. was used in the production of ethylene dibromide, a lead scavenger used in making gasoline antiknock compounds.Lead in gasoline, however, has been drastically reduced, due to environmental considerations. This will greatly affect future production of bromine.Bromine is also used in making fumigants, flameproofing agents, water purification compounds, dyes, medicinals, sanitizers, inorganic bromides forphotography, etc. Organic bromides are also important. Natural bromine is made of two isotopes, bromine-79 and bromine-81. Thirty three isotopes and isomers areknown. Bromine costs about $100/kg. 1

Propriedades físicas

Densidade:2  3.1028 g/cm3

* - at 1 atm

Configuração Electron

Configuração Electron: [Ar] 4s2 3d10 4p5
Quadra: p
Mais alto nível de energia Ocupado: 4
Elétrons de valência: 7

Números quânticos:

n = 4
ℓ = 1
m = 0
ms = -½

Colagem

Eletronegatividade (escala Pauling):3 2.96
Electropositivity (escala Pauling): 1.04
Electron Affinity:4 3.363588 eV
oxidação Unidos: ±1,+5

potencial de ionização   eV 5  kJ/mol  
1 11.81381    1139.9
2 21.8    2103.4
potencial de ionização   eV 5  kJ/mol  
3 36    3473.5
4 47.3    4563.8
5 59.7    5760.2
potencial de ionização   eV 5  kJ/mol  
6 88.6    8548.6
7 103    9938.0
8 192.8    18602.4

Termoquímica

Calor específico: 0.226 J/g°C 6 = 18.058 J/mol°C = 0.054 cal/g°C = 4.316 cal/mol°C
Condutividade térmica: 0.122 (W/m)/K, 27°C 7
Calor de fusão: 5.286 kJ/mol 8 = 66.2 J/g
Calor da vaporização: 15.438 kJ/mol 9 = 193.2 J/g
Estado da matéria Entalpia de formação (ΔHf°)10 entropia (S°)10 Gibbs Energia Livre (ΔGf°)10
(kcal/mol) (kJ/mol) (cal/K) (J/K) (kcal/mol) (kJ/mol)
(ℓ) 0 0 36.384 152.230656 0 0
(g) 7.387 30.907208 58.641 245.353944 0.751 3.142184

isótopos

nuclide Massa 11 Meia vida 11 spin nuclear 11 Energia de ligação
67Br 66.96479(54)# 1/2-# 546.93 MeV
68Br 67.95852(38)# <1.2 μs 3+# 560.59 MeV
69Br 68.95011(11)# <24 ns 1/2-# 576.11 MeV
70Br 69.94479(33)# 79.1(8) ms 0+# 589.77 MeV
71Br 70.93874(61) 21.4(6) s (5/2)- 603.43 MeV
72Br 71.93664(6) 78.6(24) s 1+ 613.37 MeV
73Br 72.93169(5) 3.4(2) min 1/2- 626.10 MeV
74Br 73.929891(16) 25.4(3) min (0-) 636.03 MeV
75Br 74.925776(15) 96.7(13) min 3/2- 647.83 MeV
76Br 75.924541(10) 16.2(2) h 1- 656.83 MeV
77Br 76.921379(3) 57.036(6) h 3/2- 667.70 MeV
78Br 77.921146(4) 6.46(4) min 1+ 675.77 MeV
79Br 78.9183371(22) ESTÁVEL 3/2- 686.63 MeV
80Br 79.9185293(22) 17.68(2) min 1+ 694.70 MeV
81Br 80.9162906(21) ESTÁVEL 3/2- 704.64 MeV
82Br 81.9168041(21) 35.282(7) h 5- 712.71 MeV
83Br 82.915180(5) 2.40(2) h 3/2- 721.71 MeV
84Br 83.916479(16) 31.80(8) min 2- 728.85 MeV
85Br 84.915608(21) 2.90(6) min 3/2- 737.86 MeV
86Br 85.918798(12) 55.1(4) s (2-) 743.13 MeV
87Br 86.920711(19) 55.65(13) s 3/2- 749.34 MeV
88Br 87.92407(4) 16.29(6) s (2-) 753.69 MeV
89Br 88.92639(6) 4.40(3) s (3/2-,5/2-) 759.89 MeV
90Br 89.93063(8) 1.91(1) s 764.24 MeV
91Br 90.93397(8) 541(5) ms 3/2-# 769.52 MeV
92Br 91.93926(5) 0.343(15) s (2-) 772.00 MeV
93Br 92.94305(32)# 102(10) ms 3/2-# 776.34 MeV
94Br 93.94868(43)# 70(20) ms 779.76 MeV
95Br 94.95287(54)# 50# ms [>300 ns] 3/2-# 784.10 MeV
96Br 95.95853(75)# 20# ms [>300 ns] 786.59 MeV
97Br 96.96280(86)# 10# ms [>300 ns] 3/2-# 790.93 MeV
Os valores marcados # não são puramente derivado a partir de dados experimentais, mas, pelo menos, parcialmente a partir de tendências sistemáticas. Gira com argumentos de atribuição fracos estão entre parênteses. 11

reações

Abundância

Terra - Os compostos de origem: halide salts or brines 18
Terra - A água do mar: 67.3 mg/L 19
Terra -  crosta:  2.4 mg/kg = 0.00024% 19
Terra -  Total:  106 ppb 20
Planeta Mercúrio) -  Total:  1.2 ppb 20
Vênus -  Total:  111 ppb 20
condritos - Total: 5 (relative to 106 atoms of Si) 21
Corpo humano - Total: 0.00029% 22

compostos

1,1,2,2-tetrabromoethane; acetylene tetrabromide; Muthmanns liquid
1,2-dibromoethane*; ethylene dibromide; ethylene bromide
1,2-dibromopropane; propylene dibromide
1,3-dibromopropane; trimethylene bromide
1-bromohexadecane; cetyl bromide; hexadecyl bromide
1-bromononane; n-bromononane; nonyl bromide
2-bromooctane; sec-octyl bromide
6-bromohexyltrimethylammonium bromide
acetyl bromide
allyl bromide; 3-bromopropene
allyltriphenylphosphonium bromide
aluminum bromide hexahydrate; aluminium bromide hexahydrate
aluminum bromide; aluminium bromide
ammonium bromide
amyl bromide
antimony tribromide
arsenic oxybromide
arsenic tribromide
barium bromide
barium bromide dihydrate
benzyl bromide; alpha-bromotoluene
berkelium(III) bromide
beryllium bromide
bismuth(III) bromide
bismuth(III) oxybromide
boron tribromide
bromine azide
bromine dioxide
bromine monochloride
bromine monofluoride
bromine monoxide
bromine pentafluoride
bromine trifluoride
butyl bromide; 1-bromobutane
cadmium bromide
calcium bromide
calcium bromide dihydrate
californium(II) bromide
californium(III) bromide
carbon tetrabromide
cerium(III) bromide
cesium bromide; caesium bromide
chromium(II) bromide
chromium(III) bromide
chromium(IV) bromide
cobalt(II) bromide; cobalt dibromide
copper(I) bromide; cuprous bromide
copper(II) bromide
curium(III) bromide
cyanogen bromide
deuterium bromide
dimethyldioctadecylammonium bromide
diphenyl methyl bromide
disulfur dibromide
dysprosium(II) bromide
dysprosium(III) bromide
einsteinium(II) bromide
einsteinium(III) bromide
erbium(III) bromide
ethyl bromide; bromoethane
europium(II) bromide
europium(III) bromide

Informação de Segurança


Material Safety Data Sheet - ACI Alloys, Inc.

Para maiores informações

Links externos:

Fontes

(1) - Lide, David R. CRC Handbook of Chemistry and Physics, 83rd ed.; CRC Press: Boca Raton, FL, 2002; p 4:6.
(2) - Lide, David R. CRC Handbook of Chemistry and Physics, 84th ed.; CRC Press: Boca Raton, FL, 2002; p 4:39-4:96.
(3) - Dean, John A. Lange's Handbook of Chemistry, 11th ed.; McGraw-Hill Book Company: New York, NY, 1973; p 4:8-4:149.
(4) - Lide, David R. CRC Handbook of Chemistry and Physics, 84th ed.; CRC Press: Boca Raton, FL, 2002; p 10:147-10:148.
(5) - Lide, David R. CRC Handbook of Chemistry and Physics, 83rd ed.; CRC Press: Boca Raton, FL, 2002; p 10:178 - 10:180.
(6) - Lide, David R. CRC Handbook of Chemistry and Physics, 83rd ed.; CRC Press: Boca Raton, FL, 2002; p 4:133.
(7) - Lide, David R. CRC Handbook of Chemistry and Physics, 83rd ed.; CRC Press: Boca Raton, FL, 2002; pp 6:193, 12:219-220.
(8) - Lide, David R. CRC Handbook of Chemistry and Physics, 83rd ed.; CRC Press: Boca Raton, FL, 2002; pp 6:123-6:137.
(9) - Lide, David R. CRC Handbook of Chemistry and Physics, 83rd ed.; CRC Press: Boca Raton, FL, 2002; pp 6:107-6:122.
(10) - Dean, John A. Lange's Handbook of Chemistry, 12th ed.; McGraw-Hill Book Company: New York, NY, 1979; p 9:4-9:94.
(11) - Atomic Mass Data Center. http://amdc.in2p3.fr/web/nubase_en.html (accessed July 14, 2009).
(12) - Ebbing, Darrell D. General Chemistry 3rd ed.; Houghton Mifflin Company: Boston, MA, 1990; p 97.
(13) - Jolly, William L. The Chemistry of the Non-Metals; Prentice-Hall: Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey, 1966; p 7.
(14) - Ebbing, Darrell D. General Chemistry 3rd ed.; Houghton Mifflin Company: Boston, MA, 1990; p 97.
(15) - Ebbing, Darrell D. General Chemistry 3rd ed.; Houghton Mifflin Company: Boston, MA, 1990; p 78.
(16) - Ebbing, Darrell D. General Chemistry 3rd ed.; Houghton Mifflin Company: Boston, MA, 1990; p 97.
(17) - Kotz, John C. and Treichel, Paul. Chemistry & Chemical Reactivity 4th ed.; Thomson Brooks/Cole: Belmont, CA, 1999; p 166.
(18) - Silberberg, Martin S. Chemistry: The Molecular Nature of Matter and Change, 4th ed.; McGraw-Hill Higher Education: Boston, MA, 2006, p 965.
(19) - Lide, David R. CRC Handbook of Chemistry and Physics, 83rd ed.; CRC Press: Boca Raton, FL, 2002; p 14:17.
(20) - Morgan, John W. and Anders, Edward, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 77, 6973-6977 (1980)
(21) - Brownlow, Arthur. Geochemistry; Prentice-Hall, Inc.: Englewood Cliffs, NJ, 1979, pp 15-16.
(22) - Lide, David R. CRC Handbook of Chemistry and Physics, 83rd ed.; CRC Press: Boca Raton, FL, 2002; p 7:17.