INDIUM

introduction

Numéro atomique: 49
Groupe: 13 or III A
Poids atomique: 114.818
Période: 5
Numero CAS: 7440-74-6

Classification

chalcogènes
Halogène
Gaz rare
lanthanides
actinides
Rare Earth Element
Groupe Platine Métal
Transuranium
Pas d'isotopes stables
Solide
Liquide
Gaz
Solide (prédit)

La description • Usages / Fonction

Discovered by Reich and Richter, who later isolated the metal. Indium is most frequently associated with zinc materials, and it is from thesethat most commercial indium is now obtained; however, it is also found in iron, lead, and copper ores. Until 1924, a gram or so constituted the world’ssupply of this element in isolated form. It is probably about as abundant as silver. About 4 million troy ounces of indium are now produced annuallyin the Free World. Canada is presently producing more than 1,000,000 troy ounces annually. The present cost of indium is about $2 to $10/g, dependingon quantity and purity. It is available in ultrapure form. Indium is a very soft, silvery-white metal with a brilliant luster. The pure metal gives a highpitched“cry” when bent. It wets glass, as does gallium. It has found application in making low-melting alloys; an alloy of 24% indium-76% galliumis liquid at room temperature. It is used in making bearing alloys, germanium transistors, rectifiers, thermistors, and photoconductors. It can be platedonto metal and evaporated onto glass, forming a mirror as good as that made with silver but with more resistance to atmospheric corrosion. There isevidence that indium has a low order of toxicity; however, care should be taken until further information is available. Sixty seven isotopes and isomersare now recognized (more than any other element). Natural indium contains two isotopes. One is stable. The other, 115In, comprising 95.71% of naturalindium is slightly radioactive with a very long half-life. 1

• "used in some alloys with silver and lead to make good heat conductors. Most indium is used in electronics." 2

Propriétés physiques

Point de fusion:3*  156.60 °C = 429.75 K = 313.88 °F
Point d'ébullition:3* 2072 °C = 2345.15 K = 3761.6 °F
sublimation point:3 
Triple point:3 
Point critique:3 
Densité:4  5.7747 g/cm3

* - at 1 atm

Configuration de l'électron

Configuration de l'électron: [Kr] 5s2 4d10 5p1
Bloque: p
Plus haut niveau d'énergie occupés: 5
Électrons de valence: 3

Nombres quantiques:

n = 5
ℓ = 1
m = -1
ms = +½

Bonding

Électronégativité (échelle de Pauling):5 1.78
Electropositivity (échelle de Pauling): 2.22
Electron Affinity:6 0.3 eV
oxydation États: +3
Fonction de travail:7 4.08 eV = 6.53616E-19 J

ionisation potentiel   eV 8  kJ/mol  
1 5.78636    558.3
ionisation potentiel   eV 8  kJ/mol  
2 18.8698    1820.7
ionisation potentiel   eV 8  kJ/mol  
3 28.03    2704.5
4 54    5210.2

Thermochimie

Chaleur spécifique: 0.233 J/g°C 9 = 26.753 J/mol°C = 0.056 cal/g°C = 6.394 cal/mol°C
Conductivité thermique: 81.6 (W/m)/K, 27°C 10
Température de fusion: 3.263 kJ/mol 11 = 28.4 J/g
Chaleur de vaporisation: 231.5 kJ/mol 12 = 2016.2 J/g
État de la matière Enthalpie de formation (ΔHf°)13 Entropy (S°)13 Gibbs Free Energy (ΔGf°)13
(kcal/mol) (kJ/mol) (cal/K) (J/K) (kcal/mol) (kJ/mol)
(s) 0 0 13.82 57.82288 0 0
(g) 58.15 243.2996 41.51 173.67784 49.89 208.73976

isotopes

Nuclide Masse 14 Demi vie 14 Spin nucléaire 14 Énergie de liaison
100In 99.93111(27) 5.9(2) s (6,7)+ 833.07 MeV
101In 100.92634(32)# 15.1(3) s 9/2+# 851.39 MeV
102In 101.92409(12) 23.3(1) s (6+) 859.46 MeV
103In 102.919914(27) 60(1) s 9/2+# 876.84 MeV
104In 103.91830(9) 1.80(3) min 5,6(+) 884.92 MeV
105In 104.914674(19) 5.07(7) min 9/2+ 892.99 MeV
106In 105.913465(13) 6.2(1) min 7+ 901.06 MeV
107In 106.910295(12) 32.4(3) min 9/2+ 909.13 MeV
108In 107.909698(10) 58.0(12) min 7+ 926.52 MeV
109In 108.907151(6) 4.2(1) h 9/2+ 934.59 MeV
110In 109.907165(13) 4.9(1) h 7+ 942.66 MeV
111In 110.905103(5) 2.8047(5) d 9/2+ 950.73 MeV
112In 111.905532(6) 14.97(10) min 1+ 958.80 MeV
113In 112.904058(3) STABLE 9/2+ 966.87 MeV
114In 113.904914(3) 71.9(1) s 1+ 974.94 MeV
115In 114.903878(5) 4.41(25)E+14 a 9/2+ 983.01 MeV
116In 115.905260(5) 14.10(3) s 1+ 991.09 MeV
117In 116.904514(6) 43.2(3) min 9/2+ 999.16 MeV
118In 117.906354(9) 5.0(5) s 1+ 1,007.23 MeV
119In 118.905845(8) 2.4(1) min 9/2+ 1,015.30 MeV
120In 119.90796(4) 3.08(8) s 1+ 1,023.37 MeV
121In 120.907846(29) 23.1(6) s 9/2+ 1,031.44 MeV
122In 121.91028(5) 1.5(3) s 1+ 1,030.20 MeV
123In 122.910438(26) 6.17(5) s (9/2)+ 1,038.27 MeV
124In 123.91318(5) 3.11(10) s 3+ 1,046.34 MeV
125In 124.91360(3) 2.36(4) s 9/2+ 1,054.41 MeV
126In 125.91646(4) 1.53(1) s 3(+#) 1,062.48 MeV
127In 126.91735(4) 1.09(1) s 9/2(+) 1,070.56 MeV
128In 127.92017(5) 0.84(6) s (3)+ 1,069.31 MeV
129In 128.92170(5) 611(4) ms 9/2+# 1,077.38 MeV
130In 129.92497(4) 0.29(2) s 1(-) 1,085.45 MeV
131In 130.92685(3) 0.28(3) s (9/2+) 1,093.53 MeV
132In 131.93299(7) 206(4) ms (7-) 1,092.28 MeV
133In 132.93781(32)# 165(3) ms (9/2+) 1,100.35 MeV
134In 133.94415(43)# 140(4) ms 1,099.11 MeV
135In 134.94933(54)# 92(10) ms 9/2+# 1,107.18 MeV
97In 96.94954(64)# 5# ms 9/2+# 792.09 MeV
98In 97.94214(21)# 45(23) ms [32(+32-11) ms] 0+# 806.68 MeV
99In 98.93422(43)# 3.1(8) s [3.0(+8-7) s] 9/2+# 822.20 MeV
Les valeurs marquées # ne sont pas purement dérivées des données expérimentales, mais au moins en partie des tendances systématiques. Spins avec de faibles arguments d'affectation sont entre parenthèses. 14

Abondance

Terre - composés Source: sulfides 15
Terre - Seawater: 0.002 mg/L 16
Terre -  Croûte:  0.25 mg/kg = 0.000025% 16
Terre -  Total:  2.14 ppb 17
Planète Mercure) -  Total:  0.024 ppb 17
Vénus -  Total:  2.24 ppb 17
chondrites - Total: 0.001 (relative to 106 atoms of Si) 18

composés

Information de sécurité


Fiche signalétique - ACI Alloys, Inc.

Pour plus d'informations

Liens externes:

Les magazines:
(1) Moyer, Michael. How Much is Left?. Scientific American, September 2010, pp 74-81.

Sources

(1) - Lide, David R. CRC Handbook of Chemistry and Physics, 83rd ed.; CRC Press: Boca Raton, FL, 2002; p 4:16.
(2) - Whitten, Kenneth W., Davis, Raymond E., and Peck, M. Larry. General Chemistry 6th ed.; Saunders College Publishing: Orlando, FL, 2000; p 933.
(3) - Lide, David R. CRC Handbook of Chemistry and Physics, 83rd ed.; CRC Press: Boca Raton, FL, 2002; p 4:132.
(4) - Lide, David R. CRC Handbook of Chemistry and Physics, 84th ed.; CRC Press: Boca Raton, FL, 2002; p 4:39-4:96.
(5) - Dean, John A. Lange's Handbook of Chemistry, 11th ed.; McGraw-Hill Book Company: New York, NY, 1973; p 4:8-4:149.
(6) - Lide, David R. CRC Handbook of Chemistry and Physics, 84th ed.; CRC Press: Boca Raton, FL, 2002; p 10:147-10:148.
(7) - Speight, James. Lange's Handbook of Chemistry, 16th ed.; McGraw-Hill Professional: Boston, MA, 2004; p 1:132.
(8) - Lide, David R. CRC Handbook of Chemistry and Physics, 83rd ed.; CRC Press: Boca Raton, FL, 2002; p 10:178 - 10:180.
(9) - Lide, David R. CRC Handbook of Chemistry and Physics, 83rd ed.; CRC Press: Boca Raton, FL, 2002; p 4:133.
(10) - Lide, David R. CRC Handbook of Chemistry and Physics, 83rd ed.; CRC Press: Boca Raton, FL, 2002; pp 6:193, 12:219-220.
(11) - Lide, David R. CRC Handbook of Chemistry and Physics, 83rd ed.; CRC Press: Boca Raton, FL, 2002; pp 6:123-6:137.
(12) - Lide, David R. CRC Handbook of Chemistry and Physics, 83rd ed.; CRC Press: Boca Raton, FL, 2002; pp 6:107-6:122.
(13) - Dean, John A. Lange's Handbook of Chemistry, 12th ed.; McGraw-Hill Book Company: New York, NY, 1979; p 9:4-9:94.
(14) - Atomic Mass Data Center. http://amdc.in2p3.fr/web/nubase_en.html (accessed July 14, 2009).
(15) - Silberberg, Martin S. Chemistry: The Molecular Nature of Matter and Change, 4th ed.; McGraw-Hill Higher Education: Boston, MA, 2006, p 965.
(16) - Lide, David R. CRC Handbook of Chemistry and Physics, 83rd ed.; CRC Press: Boca Raton, FL, 2002; p 14:17.
(17) - Morgan, John W. and Anders, Edward, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 77, 6973-6977 (1980)
(18) - Brownlow, Arthur. Geochemistry; Prentice-Hall, Inc.: Englewood Cliffs, NJ, 1979, pp 15-16.