OXÍGENO

Introducción

Número atómico: 8
Grupo: 16 or VI A
Peso atomico: 15.9994
Período: 2
Número CAS: 7782-44-7

Clasificación

chalcogen
halógeno
Gas noble
Lantanoides
Actinoides
Elemento de tierras raras
Platino Metal Group
transuranium
No hay isótopos estables
Sólido
Líquido
Gas
Sólido (Predicho)

Descripción • Usos / Función

For many centuries, workers occasionally realized air was composed of more than one component. The behavior of oxygen and nitrogen ascomponents of air led to the advancement of the phlogiston theory of combustion, which captured the minds of chemists for a century. Oxygen wasprepared by several workers, including Bayen and Borch, but they did not know how to collect it, did not study its properties, and did not recognizeit as an elementary substance. Priestley is generally credited with its discovery, although Scheele also discovered it independently. Oxygen is the thirdmost abundant element found in the sun, and it plays a part in the carbon-nitrogen cycle, one process thought to give the sun and stars their energy.Oxygen under excited conditions is responsible for the bright red and yellow-green colors of the aurora. Oxygen, as a gaseous element, forms 21%of the atmosphere by volume from which it can be obtained by liquefaction and fractional distillation. The atmosphere of Mars contains about 0.15%oxygen. The element and its compounds make up 49.2%, by weight, of the earth’s crust. About two thirds of the human body and nine tenths of wateris oxygen. In the laboratory it can be prepared by the electrolysis of water or by heating potassium chlorate with manganese dioxide as a catalyst. Thegas is colorless, odorless, and tasteless. The liquid and solid forms are a pale blue color and are strongly paramagnetic. Ozone (O3), a highly activecompound, is formed by the action of an electrical discharge or ultraviolet light on oxygen. Ozone’s presence in the atmosphere (amounting to theequivalent of a layer 3 mm thick at ordinary pressures and temperatures) is of vital importance in preventing harmful ultraviolet rays of the sun fromreaching the earth’s surface. There has been recent concern that pollutants in the atmosphere may have a detrimental effect on this ozone layer. Ozoneis toxic and exposure should not exceed 0.2 mg/m3 (8-hour time-weighted average — 40-hour work week). Undiluted ozone has a bluish color. Liquidozone is bluish black, and solid ozone is violet-black. Oxygen is very reactive and capable of combining with most elements. It is a component ofhundreds of thousands of organic compounds. It is essential for respiration of all plants and animals and for practically all combustion. In hospitalsit is frequently used to aid respiration of patients. Its atomic weight was used as a standard of comparison for each of the other elements until 1961when the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry adopted carbon 12 as the new basis. Oxygen has thirteen recognized isotopes. Naturaloxygen is a mixture of three isotopes. Oxygen 18 occurs naturally, is stable, and is available commercially. Water (H2O with 1.5% 18O) is also available.Commercial oxygen consumption in the U.S. is estimated to be 20 million short tons per year and the demand is expected to increase substantiallyin the next few years. Oxygen enrichment of steel blast furnaces accounts for the greatest use of the gas. Large quantities are also used in makingsynthesis gas for ammonia and methanol, ethylene oxide, and for oxy-acetylene welding. Air separation plants produce about 99% of the gas,electrolysis plants about 1%. The gas costs 5¢/ft3 ($1.75/cu. meters) in small quantities. 1

• "most of the energy we need to live and to run our civilization comes from the exothermic reactions of oxygen and carbon-containing molecules." 2
• "The main rockets of a space shuttle burn hydrogen with oxygen to form water vapor." 3
• "In the biological carbon cycle, animals breath oxygen and exhale carbon dioxide; plants use carbon dioxide for photosynthesis and produce oxygen as a byproduct." 4
• "The steel industry is one of the nation's largest consumers of oxygen." 5
• "3rd most produced chemical in the United States in 1995 - 22.5 megatonnes." 6
• "5th most produced chemical in the United States - 32.28 billion pounds" 7
• "Aeration [in chemical water analysis]" 8
• "Huge quantities of oxygen gas are used in steelmaking, for which about 1 tonne of oxygen is needed to prepare 1 tonne of metal. It is blown through the impure molten iron, combines with the impurities present (particularly carbon), and carries most of them away as gas. Oxygen is better for this purpose than air, which is mainly nitrogen and which carries away too much heat when it is blown through the molten metal." 9

Propiedades físicas

Densidad:10  1.308 g/L

* - at 1 atm

Configuración electronica

Configuración electronica: [He] 2s2 2p4
Bloquear: p
Ocupado más alto nivel de energía: 2
Electrones de valencia: 6

Números cuánticos:

n = 2
ℓ = 1
m = -1
ms = -½

Vinculación

electronegatividad (escala de Pauling):11 3.44
Electropositivity (escala de Pauling): 0.56
Afinidad electronica:12 1.4611096 eV
estados de oxidación: -2

potencial de ionización   eV 13  kJ/mol  
1 13.61806    1313.9
2 35.1173    3388.3
potencial de ionización   eV 13  kJ/mol  
3 54.9355    5300.5
4 77.41353    7469.3
5 113.899    10989.6
potencial de ionización   eV 13  kJ/mol  
6 138.1197    13326.5
7 739.29    71330.6
8 871.4101    84078.3

termoquímica

Calor especifico: 0.918 J/g°C 14 = 14.687 J/mol°C = 0.219 cal/g°C = 3.510 cal/mol°C
Conductividad térmica: 0.02674 (W/m)/K, 27°C 15
Calor de fusión: 0.22259 kJ/mol 16 = 13.9 J/g
Calor de vaporización: 3.4099 kJ/mol 17 = 213.1 J/g
Estado de la materia Entalpía de formación (ΔHf°)18 entropía (S°)18 Energía libre de Gibbs (ΔGf°)18
(kcal/mol) (kJ/mol) (cal/K) (J/K) (kcal/mol) (kJ/mol)
(g) 0 0 49.003 205.028552 0 0

isótopos

nucleido Masa 19 Media vida 19 spin nuclear 19 Energía de unión
12O 12.034405(20) 580(30)E-24 s [0.40(25) MeV] 0+ 58.93 MeV
13O 13.024812(10) 8.58(5) ms (3/2-) 76.31 MeV
14O 14.00859625(12) 70.598(18) s 0+ 99.29 MeV
15O 15.0030656(5) 122.24(16) s 1/2- 112.02 MeV
16O 15.99491461956(16) ESTABLE 0+ 128.47 MeV
17O 16.99913170(12) ESTABLE 5/2+ 131.88 MeV
18O 17.9991610(7) ESTABLE 0+ 139.96 MeV
19O 19.003580(3) 26.464(9) s 5/2+ 144.30 MeV
20O 20.0040767(12) 13.51(5) s 0+ 151.44 MeV
21O 21.008656(13) 3.42(10) s (1/2,3/2,5/2)+ 155.79 MeV
22O 22.00997(6) 2.25(15) s 0+ 162.93 MeV
23O 23.01569(13) 82(37) ms 1/2+# 165.41 MeV
24O 24.02047(25) 65(5) ms 0+ 168.82 MeV
25O 25.02946(28)# <50 ns (3/2+)# 168.51 MeV
26O 26.03834(28)# <40 ns 0+ 168.20 MeV
27O 27.04826(54)# <260 ns 3/2+# 166.95 MeV
28O 28.05781(64)# <100 ns 0+ 166.64 MeV
Los valores marcados con # no son puramente derivan de los datos experimentales, pero al menos en parte, de las tendencias sistemáticas. Hace girar con débiles argumentos de asignación se incluyen entre paréntesis. 19

reacciones

4 Al (s) + 3 O2 (g) + 6 H2O (ℓ) → 4 Al(OH)3 (s) 20
4 Al (s) + 3 O2 (g) → 2 Al2O3 (s alpha-corundum) 21
As4S6 (s) + 9 O2 (g) → As4O6 (s) + 6 SO2 (g) 22
2 B5H9 (ℓ) + 12 O2 (g) → 5 B2O3 (s) + 9 H2O (g) 23
C (s graphite) + 1 O2 (g) → CO2 (g) 24
2 C (s graphite) + 1 O2 (g) → 2 CO (g) 25
2 C (s graphite) + 2 H2 (g) + 1 O2 (g) → CH3COOH (ℓ acetic acid) 26
C12H22O11 (s sucrose) + 12 O2 (g) → 12 CO2 (g) + 11 H2O (g) 
2 C12H26 (ℓ 1-dodecane) + 37 O2 (g) → 24 CO2 (g) + 26 H2O (g) 27
C2H2 (g acetylene) + 3 O2 (g) → 2 CO2 (g) + H2O (g) 
C2H4 (g ethylene) + 3 O2 (g) → 2 CO2 (g) + 2 H2O (ℓ) 28
2 C2H4 (g ethylene) + 1 O2 (g) → 2 C2H4O (g) 29
C2H4 (g ethylene) + 3 O2 (g) → 2 CO2 (g) + 2 H2O (g) 
2 C2H4O (g ethylene oxide) + 5 O2 (g) → 4 CO2 (g) + 4 H2O (ℓ) 30
C2H5OH (ℓ ethanol) + 3 O2 (g) → 2 CO2 (g) + 3 H2O (g) 31
C2H5OH (ℓ ethanol) + 3 O2 (g) → 2 CO2 (g) + 3 H2O (g) 
2 C2H5SH (ℓ) + 9 O2 (g) → 4 CO2 (g) + 6 H2O (g) + 2 SO2 (g) 32
2 C2H6 (g ethane) + 7 O2 (g) → 4 CO2 (g) + 6 H2O (ℓ) 33
C2H6 (g ethane) + 4 O2 (g) → 2 CO2 (g) + 3 H2O (g) 
2 C2H6O2 (ℓ ethylene glycol) + 5 O2 (g) → 2 CO2 (g) + 3 H2O (ℓ) 34
C2H6O2 (ℓ ethylene glycol) + 3 O2 (g) → 2 CO2 (g) + 3 H2O (g) 
4 C3H5(NO3)3 (ℓ) → 6 N2 (g) + 10 H2O (g) + 12 CO2 (g) + 1 O2 (g) 35
2 C3H6 (g) + 2 NH3 (g) + 3 O2 (g) → 2 C3H3N (g) + 6 H2O (g) 36
C3H8 (g propane) + 5 O2 (g) → 3 CO2 (g) + 4 H2O (ℓ) 37
C3H8 (g propane) + 5 O2 (g) → 3 CO2 (g) + 4 H2O (g) 38
2 C45H86O6 (s glyceryl trimyristate) + 127 O2 (g) → 90 CO2 (g) + 86 H2O (ℓ) 39
2 C4H10 (g n-butane) + 13 O2 (g) → 8 CO2 (g) + 10 H2O (g) 40
C4H10 (g n-butane) + 7 O2 (g) → 4 CO2 (g) + 5 H2O (g) 
C5H10O5 (s arabinose) + 5 O2 (g) → 5 CO2 (g) + 5 H2O (ℓ) 41
C5H12 (ℓ) + 8 O2 (g) → 5 CO2 (g) + 6 H2O (ℓ) 42
C5H12 (ℓ pentane) + 8 O2 (g) → 5 CO2 (g) + 6 H2O (g) 
C6H10O5 (s) + 6 O2 (g) → 6 CO2 (g) + 5 H2O (g) 43
C6H12O6 (s) + 6 O2 (g) → 6 CO2 (g) + 6 H2O (ℓ) 44
2 C6H14 (ℓ) + 19 O2 (g) → 12 CO2 (g) + 14 H2O (g) 
C6H5CH3 (ℓ toluene) + 9 O2 (g) → 7 CO2 (g) + 4 H2O (g) 45
C6H5CH3 (ℓ toluene) + 9 O2 (g) → 7 CO2 (g) + 4 H2O (ℓ) 46
2 C6H6 (ℓ benzene) + 15 O2 (g) → 12 CO2 (g) + 6 H2O (ℓ) 47
2 C6H6 (ℓ benzene) + 15 O2 (g) → 12 CO2 (g) + 6 H2O (g) 
2 C8H18 (g) + 25 O2 (g) → 16 CO2 (g) + 18 H2O (ℓ) 48
2 Ca (s) + 1 O2 (g) → 2 CaO (s) 49
2 CH3CHO (ℓ) + 1 O2 (g) → 2 CH3COOH (ℓ acetic acid) 50
CH3COOH (ℓ acetic acid) + 2 O2 (g) → 2 CO2 (g) + 2 H2O (ℓ) 51
CH3COOH (ℓ acetic acid) + 2 O2 (g) → 2 CO2 (g) + 2 H2O (g) 
4 CH3NH2 (g) + 9 O2 (g) → 4 CO2 (g) + 10 H2O (g) + 2 N2 (g) 52
CH4 (g methane) + 2 O2 (g) → CO2 (g) + 2 H2O (ℓ) 53
CH4 (g methane) + 2 O2 (g) → CO2 (g) + 2 H2O (g) 54
2 CH4 (g methane) + 1 O2 (g) → 2 CO (g) + 4 H2 (g) 55
CH4 (g methane) + 2 O2 (g) → CO2 (g) + 2 H2O (g) 
2 CHCl3 (aq) + 1 O2 (g) + 2 H2O (ℓ) → 2 CO2 (g) + 6 HCl (aq) 56
2 CO (g) + 1 O2 (g) → 2 CO2 (g) 57
5 CO2 (g) + 55 NH4+1 (aq) + 76 O2 (g) → C5H7O2N (s bacterial tissue) + 54 NO2-1 (aq) + 52 H2O (ℓ) + 109 H+1 (aq) 58
4 Cr (s) + 3 O2 (g) → 2 Cr2O3 (s) 59
CS2 (ℓ) + 3 O2 (g) → CO2 (g) + 2 SO2 (g) 60
2 Cu(NO3)2 (s) → 2 CuO (s) + 4 NO2 (g) + 1 O2 (g) 61
Cu2S (s alpha) + 1 O2 (g) → 2 Cu (s) + SO2 (g) 62
2 CuFeS3 (s) + 7 O2 (g) → 6 Cu (s) + 2 FeO (s) + 6 SO2 (g) 63
2 CuS + 1 O2 → Cu2S + SO2  64
4 Fe (s alpha) + 3 O2 (g) → 2 Fe2O3 (s hematite) 65
4 Fe (s) + 3 O2 (g) + 6 H2O (ℓ) → 4 Fe(OH)3 (s) 66
4 FeO (s) + 1 O2 (g) → 2 Fe2O3 (s hematite) 67
4 FeS2 (s pyrite) + 2 H2O (ℓ) + 15 O2 (g) → 2 Fe2(SO4)3 (aq) + 2 H2SO4 (aq) 68
2 H2 (g) + 1 O2 (g) → 2 H2O (ℓ) 69
2 H2 (g) + 1 O2 (g) → 2 H2O (g) 70
H2 (g) + 1 O2 (g) → H2O2 (ℓ) 71
2 H2O (ℓ) → 2 H2 (g) + O2 (g) 72
2 H2O2 (aq) → 2 H2O (ℓ) + O2 (g) 73
2 H2O2 (aq) → 2 H2O (ℓ) + O2 (g) 74
5 H2O2 (aq) + 2 KMnO4 (aq) + 3 H2SO4 (aq) → 5 O2 (g) + 2 MnSO4 (aq) + 1 K2SO4 (aq) + 8 H2O (ℓ) 75
H2S (aq) + 2 O2 (aq) → H2SO4 (aq) 76
2 H2S (g) + 3 O2 (g) → 2 H2O (ℓ) + 2 SO2 (g) 77
2 H2S (g) + 3 O2 (g) → 2 H2O (g) + 2 SO2 (g) 78
2 HgO (s red orthorhombic) → 2 Hg (ℓ) + O2 (g) 79
2 KClO3 (s) → 2 KCl (s) + 3 O2 (g) 80
2 KNO3 (aq) → 2 KNO2 (aq) + O2 (g) 81
4 KNO3 (s) → 2 K2O (s) + 2 N2 (g) + 5 O2 (g) 82
4 KO2 (s) + 2 H2O (ℓ) → 4 KOH (s) + 3 O2 (g) 83
4 KO2 (s) + 6 H2O (ℓ) → 4 KOH (s) + O2 (g) + 4 H2O2 (aq) 84
2 Mg (s) + 1 O2 (g) → 2 MgO (s) 85
2 MoS2 (s) + 7 O2 (g) → 2 MoO3 (s) + 4 SO2 (g) 86
N2 (g) + 2 O2 (g) → 2 NO2 (g) 87
N2 (g) + 1 O2 (g) → 2 NO (g) 88
N2H4 (ℓ) + 1 O2 (g) → N2 (g) + H2O (ℓ) 89
2 N2O5 (s) → 4 NO2 (g) + O2 (g) 90
2 Na2O2 (s) + 2 H2O (ℓ) → 4 NaOH (aq) + O2 (g) 91
2 NaNO3 (s) → 2 NaNO2 (s) + O2 (g) 92
4 NH3 (g) + 3 O2 (g) → 2 N2 (g) + 6 H2O (g) 93
4 NH3 (g) + 5 O2 (g) → 4 NO (g) + 6 H2O (g) 94
2 NH3 (g) + 3 O2 (g) + 2 CH4 (g) → 2 HCN (g) + 6 H2O (g) 95
4 NH3 (aq) + 5 O2 (aq) → 4 NO (g) + 6 H2O (ℓ) 96
2 NO (g) + 1 O2 (g) → 2 NO2 (g) 97
P4 (s) + 5 O2 (g) → P4O10 (s) 98
P4S3 (s) + 8 O2 (g) → P4O10 (s) + 3 SO2 (g) 99
PbS + 1 O2 → Pb + SO2  100
2 PbS (s) + 3 O2 (g) → 2 SO2 (g) + 2 PbO (s red) 101
2 S (s rhombic) + 3 O2 (g) → 2 SO3 (g) 102
S8 (s) + 8 O2 (g) → 8 SO2 (g) 103
SiCl4 (g) + 1 O2 (g) + 2 H2 (g) → SiO2 (s quartz) + 4 HCl (g) 104
SiCl4 (g) + 1 O2 (g) → SiO2 (s quartz) + 2 Cl2 (g) 104
2 SO2 (g) + 1 O2 (g) → 2 SO3 (g) 105
2 SO2 (g) + 2 CaCO3 (s) + 1 O2 (g) → 2 CaSO4 (s) + 2 CO2 (g) 106
TiCl4 (g) + 1 O2 (g) → TiO2 (s rutile) + 2 Cl2 (g) 107
3 TiO2 (s rutile) + 4 BrF3 (ℓ) → 3 TiF4 (s) + 2 Br2 (ℓ) + 3 O2 (g) 108
2 ZnS (s sphalerite) + 3 O2 (g) → 2 ZnO (s) + 2 SO2 (g) 109
2 ZnS (s sphalerite) + 2 H2SO4 (aq) + 1 O2 (g) → 2 ZnSO4 (aq) + 2 S (s rhombic) + 2 H2O (ℓ) 110
ZnS + 2 O2 → ZnSO4  111
NO (g) + 1 O3 (g) → NO2 (g) + O2 (g) 112
2 NO2 (g) + 1 O3 (g) → N2O5 (g) + O2 (g) 112

Abundancia

Tierra - Los compuestos de origen: uncombined 113
Tierra - Agua de mar: 857000 mg/L 114
Tierra -  Corteza:  461000 mg/kg = 46.1% 114
Tierra -  Manto:  43.7% 115
Tierra -  litosfera:  45.5% 116
Tierra -  Hidrosfera:  85.8% 116
Tierra -  Atmósfera:  23% 116
Tierra -  Total:  30.12% 117
Planeta mercurio) -  Total:  14.44% 117
Venus -  Total:  30.90% 117
Universo -  Total:  1.07% 115
condritas - Total: 3.7×106 (relative to 106 atoms of Si) 118
Cuerpo humano - Total: 61% 119

Compuestos

4-vinylcyclohexene dioxide
acetic acid*; ethanoic acid; acetyl hydroxide
aluminum hydroxide; aluminium hydroxide
aluminum oxide; aluminium oxide
ammonium hydroxide
antimony copper oxide
antimony pentoxide
antimony tetroxide
antimony trioxide
arsenic dioxide
arsenic monoxide
arsenic tetraoxide
arsenic trioxide
arsenic(V) oxide; arsenic pentoxide
barium hydroxide
barium hydroxide monohydrate
barium hydroxide octahydrate
barium oxide
barium peroxide; barium dioxide
benzoyl peroxide
berkelium(II) oxide
berkelium(III) oxide
berkelium(IV) oxide
beryllium hydroxide
beryllium oxide
bismuth(III) hydroxide
bismuth(III) oxide; bismuth trioxide
bismuth(IV) peroxide
bromine dioxide
bromine monoxide
cadmium hydroxide
cadmium oxide
calcium hydroxide
calcium oxide
calcium peroxide
californium(III) oxide
californium(IV) oxide
carbon dioxide; dry ice; carbonic anhydride
carbon monoxide
cerium(IV) oxide
cesium hydroxide; caesium hydroxide
cesium oxide; caesium oxide
cesium peroxide; caesium peroxide
cesium superoxide; caesium superoxide
chlorine dioxide
choline hydroxide
chromium(II, III) oxide
chromium(III) oxide; chromium sesquioxide
chromium(IV) oxide
chromium(VI) hydroxide
chromium(VI) oxide
cobalt(II) hydroxide
cobalt(II) oxide; cobalt monoxide
cobalt(III) hydroxide
cobalt(III) oxide monohydrate
cobalt(III) oxide; cobalt trioxide
copper(I) oxide; cuprous oxide
copper(II) hydroxide
copper(II) oxide*; cupric oxide
curium(II) oxide
curium(III) oxide
curium(IV) oxide
cyclophosphamide; (RS)-N,N-bis(2-chloroethyl)-1,3,2-oxazaphosphinan-2-amine 2-oxide*; Endoxan
deuterium monoxide; heavy water
diboron trioxide
dichlorine heptoxide
dichlorine hexoxide
dichlorine monoxide
dichlorine trioxide
diiodine pentoxide*; iodine(V) oxide; iodic anhydride
diiodine tetroxide
dinitrogen monoxide*; nitrous oxide; laughing gas
dinitrogen pentoxide
dinitrogen tetroxide
dinitrogen trioxide
disulfur monoxide
dysprosium(III) oxide
einsteinium(III) oxide
erbium(III) oxide
ethylene oxide; epoxyethane; oxirane
europium(III) oxide
gadolinium(III) oxide
gallium(I) oxide
gallium(II) oxide
gallium(III) hydroxide
gallium(III) oxide
germanium(II) oxide
germanium(IV) methoxide
germanuim(IV) oxide
gold(III) hydroxide
gold(III) oxide
hafnium oxide
hexamethyldisiloxane*; bis(trimethylsilyl) ether; bis(trimethylsilyl) oxide
holmium oxide
hydrogen peroxide
indium(III) hydroxide
indium(III) oxide
iridium(II) oxide dihydrate
iridium(IV) oxide
iron hydroxide oxide
iron(II) hydroxide; ferrous hydroxide
iron(II) oxide; ferrous oxide
iron(II, III) oxide; triiron tetroxide
iron(III) hydroxide; ferric hydroxide
iron(III) oxide; ferric oxide
lanthanum oxide
lauroyl peroxide
lead(II) hydroxide
lead(II) oxide; lead monoxide
lead(II, II, IV) oxide; red lead oxide
lead(II, IV) oxide
lead(IV) oxide; lead dioxide
lithium hydroxide
lithium hydroxide monohydrate
lithium methoxide
lithium oxide
lithium peroxide
lithium superoxide
lutetium oxide
magnesium hydroxide
magnesium oxide
magnesium peroxide
manganese sesquioxide
manganese(II) oxide
manganese(II, III) oxide
manganese(IV) oxide; manganese dioxide
manganese(VII) oxide
mercury(I) oxide
mercury(II) oxide
mesityl oxide
methylmercury hydroxide
molybdenum(II) oxide
molybdenum(III) oxide; molybdenum trioxide
molybdenum(IV) oxide; molybdenum dioxide
molybdenum(V) oxide
molybdenum(VI) oxide
neodymium(III) oxide
neptunium(II) oxide
neptunium(IV) oxide
neptunium(V) oxide
nickel dioxide
nickel(II) hydroxide
nickel(II) oxide; nickel monoxide
nickel(II) titanate; nickel titanium oxide
nickel(III) oxide
niobium(II) oxide
niobium(IV) oxide
niobium(V) oxide
nitrogen dioxide
nitrogen monoxide; nitric oxide
osmium tetroxide
osmium(IV) oxide
oxygen difluoride; oxygen(II) fluoride
palladium(II) oxide
palladium(IV) oxide
phenylmercuric hydroxide
phosgene; carbonyl dichloride*; CG; carbon dichloride oxide; carbon oxychloride; Chloroformyl chloride; dichloroformaldehyde; dichloromethanone
phosphorus decaoxide
phosphorus hexoxide
phosphorus pentoxide
phosphorus trioxide
platinum(II) oxide
platinum(IV) oxide
platinum(IV) oxide monohydrate
plutonium(II) oxide
plutonium(III) oxide
plutonium(IV) oxide
potassium ethoxide
potassium hydroxide
potassium methoxide
potassium oxide
potassium peroxide
potassium superoxide
praseodymium(III) oxide
praseodymium(IV) oxide
promethium(III) oxide
protactinium(II) oxide
protactinium(IV) oxide
protactinium(V) oxide
radium hydroxide
radium oxide
rhenium(III) oxide
rhenium(IV) oxide
rhenium(VI) oxide
rhenium(VII) oxide
rhodium(III) oxide
rhodium(IV) oxide
rubidium hydroxide
rubidium oxide
rubidium peroxide
rubidium superoxide
ruthenium tetraoxide; ruthenium(VIII) oxide
ruthenium(IV) oxide; ruthenium dioxide
ruthenium(VI) oxide
samarium(III) oxide
scandium(III) oxide
selenium dioxide
selenium trioxide
silicon dioxide
silicon(II) oxide; silicon monoxide
silver oxide
silver peroxide; silver (I,III) oxide
sodium aluminate; sodium aluminium oxide
sodium ethoxide
sodium hydroxide
sodium methoxide; sodium methylate
sodium oxide
sodium peroxide
sodium superoxide
strontium hydroxide
strontium oxide
strontium peroxide
styrene oxide; 2-phenyloxirane; phenyloxirane
sulfur dioxide
sulfur monoxide
sulfur trioxide
tantalum(II) oxide
tantalum(IV) oxide; tantalum dioxide
tantalum(V) oxide
technetium(IV) oxide
technetium(VII) oxide
tellurium dioxide
tellurium monoxide
tellurium trioxide
terbium(III) oxide
terbium(IV) oxide
tetraethylammonioum hydroxide
thallium(I) ethoxide
thallium(I) hydroxide
thallium(I) oxide
thallium(III) oxide
thionyl chloride; sulfurous dichloride; sulfur monoxide dichloride
thorium(IV) oxide
thulium(III) oxide
tin(II) oxide
tin(IV) oxide; tin dioxide; stannic oxide
titanium(II) oxide
titanium(III) oxide
titanium(III, IV) oxide
titanium(IV) ethoxide
titanium(IV) isopropoxide; tetraisopropyl titanate; titanium tetraisopropoxide
titanium(IV) oxide
trimethyl borate; boron trimethoxide
tungsten(IV) oxide
tungsten(VI) dioxydichloride; tungsten dichloride dioxide
tungsten(VI) oxide; tungsten trioxide
uranium(IV) oxide
uranium(IV, V) oxide
uranium(V) oxide
uranium(V, VI) oxide
uranium(VI) oxide
urea hydrogen peroxide
vanadium(II) oxide
vanadium(III) oxide; vanadium trioxide
vanadium(IV) oxide
vanadium(V) oxide; vanadium pentoxide
vanadyl sulfate; vanadium (IV) oxysulfate; vanadium(IV) oxide sulfate
water; dihydrogen monoxide; hydrogen hydroxide
xenon tetroxide
xenon trioxide
ytterbium(III) oxide
yttrium(III) oxide
zinc hydroxide
zinc oxide
zinc peroxide
zinc pyrithione; 2-mercaptopyridine-1-oxide zinc salt; ZNPT
zirconium chloride hydroxide
zirconium(II) oxide
zirconium(IV) hydroxide
zirconium(IV) oxide; zirconium dioxide

Información de seguridad


Ficha de datos de seguridad de materiales - ACI Alloys, Inc.

Para más información

Enlaces externos:

revistas:
(1) Catling, David C. and Zahnle, Kevin J. The Planetary Air Leak. Scientific American, May 2009, pp 36-43.
(2) Cowen, Ron. Europa's Oxygen-Filled Ocean. Science News, November 7, 2009, pp 8.
(3) Barry, C. Oxygen Rocks. Science News, September 1, 2007, pp 132-133.

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