WISMUT

Einführung

Ordnungszahl: 83
Gruppe: 15 or V A
Atomares Gewicht: 208.98038
Periode: 6
CAS-Nummer: 7440-69-9

Einstufung

Metall
Nonmetal
metalloider
Alkalimetall
Erdalkalimetalls
Übergangsmetall
Chalkogenhaltige
Halogen
Edelgas
Lanthanoid
Actinoidenelemente
Seltene Erden
Platingruppenmetall
Transurane
Keine Stabile Isotope
Solide
Flüssigkeit
Gas
Solide (Prognostizierte)

Beschreibung • Verwendung / Funktion

In early times bismuth was confused with tin and lead. Claude Geoffroy the Younger showed it to be distinct fromlead in 1753. It is a white crystalline, brittle metal with a pinkish tinge. It occurs native. The most important ores are bismuthinite or bismuth glance(Bi2S3) and bismite (Bi2O3). Peru, Japan, Mexico, Bolivia, and Canada are major bismuth producers. Much of the bismuth produced in the U.S. isobtained as a by-product in refining lead, copper, tin, silver, and gold ores. Bismuth is the most diamagnetic of all metals, and the thermal conductivityis lower than any metal, except mercury. It has a high electrical resistance, and has the highest Hall effect of any metal (i.e., greatest increase in electricalresistance when placed in a magnetic field). “Bismanol” is a permanent magnet of high coercive force, made of MnBi, by the U.S. Naval SurfaceWeapons Center. Bismuth expands 3.32% on solidification. This property makes bismuth alloys particularly suited to the making of sharp castingsof objects subject to damage by high temperatures. With other metals such as tin, cadmium, etc., bismuth forms low-melting alloys which areextensively used for safety devices in fire detection and extinguishing systems. Bismuth is used in producing malleable irons and is finding use as acatalyst for making acrylic fibers. When bismuth is heated in air it burns with a blue flame, forming yellow fumes of the oxide. The metal is also usedas a thermocouple material, and has found application as a carrier for U235 or U233 fuel in atomic reactors. Its soluble salts are characterized by forminginsoluble basic salts on the addition of water, a property sometimes used in detection work. Bismuth oxychloride is used extensively in cosmetics.Bismuth subnitrate and subcarbonate are used in medicine. Natural bismuth contains only one isotope 209Bi. Forty one isotopes and isomers of bismuthare known. Bismuth metal costs about $90/kg (99.999%). 1

Physikalische Eigenschaften

Schmelzpunkt:2*  271.40 °C = 544.55 K = 520.52 °F
Siedepunkt:2* 1564 °C = 1837.15 K = 2847.2 °F
Sublimationspunkt:2 
Dreifacher Punkt:2 
Kritischer Punkt:2 
Dichte:3  9.79 g/cm3

* - at 1 atm

Elektronenkonfiguration

Elektronenkonfiguration: [Xe] 6s2 4f14 5d10 6p3
Block: p
Höchster besetztes Energieniveau: 6
Valenzelektronen: 5

Quantenzahlen:

n = 6
ℓ = 1
m = 1
ms = +½

Kleben

Elektronegativität (Pauling-Skala):4 1.9
Electropositivity (Pauling-Skala): 2.1
Elektronenaffinität:5 0.946 eV
oxidations~~POS=TRUNC: +3,5
Arbeitsfuntkion:6 4.36 eV = 6.98472E-19 J

Ionisationspotential   eV 7  kJ/mol  
1 7.2856    703.0
2 16.69    1610.3
Ionisationspotential   eV 7  kJ/mol  
3 25.56    2466.2
4 45.3    4370.8
Ionisationspotential   eV 7  kJ/mol  
5 56    5403.2
6 88.3    8519.7

Thermochemie

Spezifische Wärme: 0.122 J/g°C 8 = 25.496 J/mol°C = 0.029 cal/g°C = 6.094 cal/mol°C
Wärmeleitfähigkeit: 7.87 (W/m)/K, 27°C 9
Schmelzwärme: 11.3 kJ/mol 10 = 54.1 J/g
Verdampfungswärme: 104.8 kJ/mol 11 = 501.5 J/g
Aggregatszustand Bildungsenthalpie (ΔHf°)12 Entropie (S°)12 Gibbs-Energie (ΔGf°)12
(kcal/mol) (kJ/mol) (cal/K) (J/K) (kcal/mol) (kJ/mol)
(s) 0 0 13.56 56.73504 0 0
(g) 49.5 207.108 44.67 186.89928 40.2 168.1968

Isotopes

Nuklid Masse 13 Halbwertzeit 13 Kernspin 13 Bindungsenergie
184Bi 184.00112(14)# 6.6(15) ms 3+# 1,420.19 MeV
185Bi 184.99763(6)# 2# ms 9/2-# 1,437.57 MeV
186Bi 185.99660(8) 14.8(7) ms (3+) 1,445.64 MeV
187Bi 186.993158(16) 32(3) ms 9/2-# 1,453.71 MeV
188Bi 187.99227(5) 44(3) ms 3+# 1,461.79 MeV
189Bi 188.98920(6) 674(11) ms (9/2-) 1,479.17 MeV
190Bi 189.9883(2) 6.3(1) s (3+) 1,487.24 MeV
191Bi 190.985786(8) 12.3(3) s (9/2-) 1,495.31 MeV
192Bi 191.98546(4) 34.6(9) s (3+) 1,503.39 MeV
193Bi 192.98296(1) 67(3) s (9/2-) 1,511.46 MeV
194Bi 193.98283(5) 95(3) s (3+) 1,519.53 MeV
195Bi 194.980651(6) 183(4) s (9/2-) 1,527.60 MeV
196Bi 195.980667(26) 5.1(2) min (3+) 1,535.67 MeV
197Bi 196.978864(9) 9.33(50) min (9/2-) 1,553.06 MeV
198Bi 197.97921(3) 10.3(3) min (2+,3+) 1,561.13 MeV
199Bi 198.977672(13) 27(1) min 9/2- 1,569.20 MeV
200Bi 199.978132(26) 36.4(5) min 7+ 1,577.27 MeV
201Bi 200.977009(16) 108(3) min 9/2- 1,585.34 MeV
202Bi 201.977742(22) 1.72(5) h 5(+#) 1,593.41 MeV
203Bi 202.976876(23) 11.76(5) h 9/2- 1,601.49 MeV
204Bi 203.977813(28) 11.22(10) h 6+ 1,609.56 MeV
205Bi 204.977389(8) 15.31(4) d 9/2- 1,617.63 MeV
206Bi 205.978499(8) 6.243(3) d 6(+) 1,625.70 MeV
207Bi 206.9784707(26) 32.9(14) a 9/2- 1,633.77 MeV
208Bi 207.9797422(25) 3.68(4)E+5 a (5)+ 1,641.84 MeV
209Bi 208.9803987(16) 1.9(2)E+19 a 9/2- 1,640.60 MeV
210Bi 209.9841204(16) 5.012(5) d 1- 1,648.67 MeV
211Bi 210.987269(6) 2.14(2) min 9/2- 1,656.74 MeV
212Bi 211.9912857(21) 60.55(6) min 1(-) 1,655.50 MeV
213Bi 212.994385(5) 45.59(6) min 9/2- 1,663.57 MeV
214Bi 213.998712(12) 19.9(4) min 1- 1,671.64 MeV
215Bi 215.001770(16) 7.6(2) min (9/2-) 1,670.40 MeV
216Bi 216.006306(12) 2.17(5) min 1-# 1,678.47 MeV
217Bi 217.00947(21)# 98.5(8) s 9/2-# 1,686.54 MeV
218Bi 218.01432(39)# 33(1) s 1-# 1,685.30 MeV
Werte markiert # sind nicht rein aus experimentellen Daten abgeleitet, aber zumindest teilweise von der systematischen Trends. Dreht mit schwachen Zuordnung Argumente in Klammern eingeschlossen sind. 13

Die Reaktionen

Fülle

Erde - Ausgangsverbindungen: sulfides 15
Erde - Meerwasser: 0.00002 mg/L 16
Erde -  Kruste:  0.0085 mg/kg = 0.00000085% 16
Erde -  Gesamt:  2.94 ppb 17
Der Planet Merkur) -  Gesamt:  0.034 ppb 17
Venus -  Gesamt:  3.08 ppb 17
Chondrite - Gesamt: 0.002 (relative to 106 atoms of Si) 18

Verbindungen

Preise





Sicherheitsinformation


Datenblatt zur Materialsicherheit - ACI Alloys, Inc.

Für mehr Informationen

Externe Links:

Quellen

(1) - Lide, David R. CRC Handbook of Chemistry and Physics, 83rd ed.; CRC Press: Boca Raton, FL, 2002; p 4:5-4:6.
(2) - Lide, David R. CRC Handbook of Chemistry and Physics, 83rd ed.; CRC Press: Boca Raton, FL, 2002; p 4:132.
(3) - Lide, David R. CRC Handbook of Chemistry and Physics, 84th ed.; CRC Press: Boca Raton, FL, 2002; p 4:39-4:96.
(4) - Dean, John A. Lange's Handbook of Chemistry, 11th ed.; McGraw-Hill Book Company: New York, NY, 1973; p 4:8-4:149.
(5) - Lide, David R. CRC Handbook of Chemistry and Physics, 84th ed.; CRC Press: Boca Raton, FL, 2002; p 10:147-10:148.
(6) - Speight, James. Lange's Handbook of Chemistry, 16th ed.; McGraw-Hill Professional: Boston, MA, 2004; p 1:132.
(7) - Lide, David R. CRC Handbook of Chemistry and Physics, 83rd ed.; CRC Press: Boca Raton, FL, 2002; p 10:178 - 10:180.
(8) - Lide, David R. CRC Handbook of Chemistry and Physics, 83rd ed.; CRC Press: Boca Raton, FL, 2002; p 4:133.
(9) - Lide, David R. CRC Handbook of Chemistry and Physics, 83rd ed.; CRC Press: Boca Raton, FL, 2002; pp 6:193, 12:219-220.
(10) - Lide, David R. CRC Handbook of Chemistry and Physics, 83rd ed.; CRC Press: Boca Raton, FL, 2002; pp 6:123-6:137.
(11) - Lide, David R. CRC Handbook of Chemistry and Physics, 83rd ed.; CRC Press: Boca Raton, FL, 2002; pp 6:107-6:122.
(12) - Dean, John A. Lange's Handbook of Chemistry, 12th ed.; McGraw-Hill Book Company: New York, NY, 1979; p 9:4-9:94.
(13) - Atomic Mass Data Center. http://amdc.in2p3.fr/web/nubase_en.html (accessed July 14, 2009).
(14) - Silberberg, Martin S. Chemistry: The Molecular Nature of Matter and Change 4th ed.; McGraw-Hill: Boston, MA, 2006; p 128.
(15) - Silberberg, Martin S. Chemistry: The Molecular Nature of Matter and Change, 4th ed.; McGraw-Hill Higher Education: Boston, MA, 2006, p 965.
(16) - Lide, David R. CRC Handbook of Chemistry and Physics, 83rd ed.; CRC Press: Boca Raton, FL, 2002; p 14:17.
(17) - Morgan, John W. and Anders, Edward, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 77, 6973-6977 (1980)
(18) - Brownlow, Arthur. Geochemistry; Prentice-Hall, Inc.: Englewood Cliffs, NJ, 1979, pp 15-16.