IRON(III) OXIDE - (1309-37-1)

Introduction

Name: iron(III) oxide; ferric oxide
* IUPAC
CAS Number: 1309-37-1
Chemical Formula: Fe2O3
Molar Mass: 159.6882 g
Mass Percent: Fe 69.942 %; O 30.057 % 

Classification

• inorganic

Uses/Function

• "The rich reddish color of the Needles in Canyonlands National Park in Utah is due to large amounts of iron(III) oxide, Fe2O3, in the rock." 1

• "...gives its rich rust-red color to iron ores and various clay minerals that contain Fe2O3." 2

• "Hematite (Fe2O3), the most important iron ore, contains about 70 per cent iron." 3

• "The most important ore of iron." 4

• "As pigment for rubber, paints, paper, linoleum, ceramics, glass; in paint for ironwork, ship hulls; as polishing agent for glass, precious metals, diamonds; in electrical resistors and semiconductors; in magnets, magnetic tapes; as catalyst; colloidal sol[utio]ns as stain for polysaccharides." 5

• "Ferric oxide is brittle and can be easily chipped off the surface, exposing fresh metal underneath to additional corrosion to the extent that holes (called pits) are formed." 6

Bonding

Bonding: polar covalent
Ionic Character: 48.79 %

Thermochemistry

ΔHf° (s hematite): -197.0 kcal/mol 7 = -824.25 kJ/mol
S° (s hematite): 20.89 cal/(mol•K) 8 = 87.40 J/(mol•K)
ΔGf° (s hematite): -177.4 kcal/mol 9 = -742.24 kJ/mol

Reactions

For More Information

Wikipedia
Journals:
Carrick M. Eggleston, Science 320, 184-185 (2008)
Jung Ho Ahn and Peter R. Buseck, Science 250, 111-113 (1990)
D. J. Dunlop, Science 169, 858-860 (1970)
Sid Perkins, Science News 175, 9 (2009)
Eric E. Roden and Robert G. Wetzel, Limnol. Oceanogr. 47, 198-211 (2002)

Sources

(1) - Gillespie, Ronald J., Eaton, Donald R., Humphreys, David A., and Robinson, Edward A. Atoms, Molecules, and Reactions; Prentice-Hall: Englewood Cliffs, NJ, 1994; p 704.
(2) - Brady, James E. and Senese, Fred. Chemistry: Matter and Changes, 4th ed.; John Wiley and Sons: Hoboken, New Jersey, 2004; p 1007.
(3) - Zim, Herbert S. and Shaffer, Paul R. Rocks and Minerals; Golden Press: New York City, New York, 1957; p 40.
(4) - Pough, Frederick H. Rocks and Minerals, 4th ed,; Houghton Mifflin Company: Boston, MA, 1988; p 114.
(5) - The Merck Index: An Encyclopedia of Chemicals, Drugs, and Biologicals, 13th ed.; Budavari, S.; O'Neil, M.J.; Smith, A.; Heckelman, P. E.; Kinneary, J. F., Eds.; Merck & Co.: Whitehouse Station, NJ, 2001; entry 4058.
(6) - Halka, Monica and Nordstrom, Brian. Metals & Metalloids; Infobase Publishing: New York, NY, 2011; p 7.
(7) - Dean, John A. Lange's Handbook of Chemistry, 12th ed.; McGraw-Hill Book Company: New York, NY, 1979; p 9:4-9:94.
(8) - Dean, John A. Lange's Handbook of Chemistry, 12th ed.; McGraw-Hill Book Company: New York, NY, 1979; p 9:4-9:94.
(9) - Dean, John A. Lange's Handbook of Chemistry, 12th ed.; McGraw-Hill Book Company: New York, NY, 1979; p 9:4-9:94.
(10) - Kotz, John C., Treichel, Paul, and Weaver, Gabriela. Chemistry & Chemical Reactivity 6th ed.; Thomson Brooks/Cole: Belmont, CA, 2006; p 157.
(11) - Zumdahl, Steven and Zumdahl, Susan A. Chemistry 9th ed.; Brooks/Cole: Belmont, CA, 2014; p 132.
(12) - Halka, Monica and Nordstrom, Brian. Metals & Metalloids; Infobase Publishing: New York, NY, 2011; p 15.
(13) - Ebbing, Darrell D. General Chemistry 3rd ed.; Houghton Mifflin Company: Boston, MA, 1990; p 77.
(14) - Halka, Monica and Nordstrom, Brian. Metals & Metalloids; Infobase Publishing: New York, NY, 2011; p 7.
(15) - Kotz, John C., Treichel, Paul, and Weaver, Gabriela. Chemistry & Chemical Reactivity 6th ed.; Thomson Brooks/Cole: Belmont, CA, 2006; p 167.
(16) - Zumdahl, Steven and Zumdahl, Susan A. Chemistry 9th ed.; Brooks/Cole: Belmont, CA, 2014; p 131.