OZONE - (10028-15-6)

Introduction

Name: ozone
* IUPAC
CAS Number: 10028-15-6
Chemical Formula: O3
Molar Mass: 47.9982 g
Mass Percent: O 100 % 

Classification

• inorganic

Uses/Function

• "…can be used to replace chlorine for destroying bacteria in water by oxidation." 1

• "It has been suggested that magnesium, an essential component in chlorophyll, is removed from pine needles by the combined effects of ozone and acids...Another harmful effect of acid rain may be that it leaches essential metal ions such as Ca2+ and Mg2+ from soil as soluble salts." 2

• "Carbon dioxide and water are not the only greenhouse gases. Methane, the CFCs, N2O, O3, and CO also absorb infrared radiation. Although they are present in the atmosphere at very low concentrations, they absorb infrared radiation relatively strongly and in regions of the spectrum not absorbed by CO2 and H2O." 3

• "is a powerful oxidizing agent that damages rubber, plastic materials, and all plant and animal life." 4

• "protects living things by absorbing much of the damaging short-wavelength ultraviolet radiation from the sun." 5

• "...is also one component of photochemical smog...It is used as a water disinfectant (especially in Europe) and a bleach...Radiation from the sun contains ultraviolet radiation of short wavelengths, which are harmful to biological organisms. Fortunately, these harmful wavelengths are absorbed before they reach the surface of the earth. The most energetic are absorbed by O2 in the earth's upper atmosphere. Less energetic but still harmful radiation is absorbed by the ozone in the stratosphere. Biologists believe that living organisms appeared on land only after the formation of sufficient ozone in the atmosphere about 600 million years ago." 6

• "As a disinfectant for air and water by virtue of its oxidizing power. For bleaching waxes, textiles, oils. In organic syntheses. Forms ozonides which are sometimes useful oxidizing comp[oun]ds." 7

Bonding

Thermochemistry

ΔHf° (g): 34.1 kcal/mol 8 = 142.67 kJ/mol
S° (g): 57.08 cal/(mol•K) 9 = 238.82 J/(mol•K)
ΔGf° (g): 39.0 kcal/mol 10 = 163.18 kJ/mol

Reactions

For More Information

Sources

(1) - Gillespie, Ronald J., Eaton, Donald R., Humphreys, David A., and Robinson, Edward A. Atoms, Molecules, and Reactions; Prentice-Hall: Englewood Cliffs, NJ, 1994; p 591.
(2) - Gillespie, Ronald J., Eaton, Donald R., Humphreys, David A., and Robinson, Edward A. Atoms, Molecules, and Reactions; Prentice-Hall: Englewood Cliffs, NJ, 1994; p 604.
(3) - Gillespie, Ronald J., Eaton, Donald R., Humphreys, David A., and Robinson, Edward A. Atoms, Molecules, and Reactions; Prentice-Hall: Englewood Cliffs, NJ, 1994; p 607.
(4) - Whitten, Kenneth W., Davis, Raymond E., and Peck, M. Larry. General Chemistry 6th ed.; Saunders College Publishing: Orlando, FL, 2000; p 962.
(5) - Swaddle, T.W. Inorganic Chemistry; Academic Press: San Diego, 1997; p 6.
(6) - Ebbing, Darrell D. General Chemistry 3rd ed.; Houghton Mifflin Company: Boston, MA, 1990; pp 389-390.
(7) - The Merck Index: An Encyclopedia of Chemicals, Drugs, and Biologicals, 13th ed.; Budavari, S.; O'Neil, M.J.; Smith, A.; Heckelman, P. E.; Kinneary, J. F., Eds.; Merck & Co.: Whitehouse Station, NJ, 2001; entry 7051.
(8) - Dean, John A. Lange's Handbook of Chemistry, 12th ed.; McGraw-Hill Book Company: New York, NY, 1979; p 9:4-9:94.
(9) - Dean, John A. Lange's Handbook of Chemistry, 12th ed.; McGraw-Hill Book Company: New York, NY, 1979; p 9:4-9:94.
(10) - Dean, John A. Lange's Handbook of Chemistry, 12th ed.; McGraw-Hill Book Company: New York, NY, 1979; p 9:4-9:94.
(11) - Atkins, Jones, and Laverman. Chemical Principles 6th ed.; W.H. Freeman and Company: New York, NY, 2013; p F94.